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Coleman Tyson Seikman Prison Chaplain Scholarship Endowment

As members of The United Methodist Church, we are part of a long tradition of serving the spiritual and physical needs of incarcerated men and women as well as their families. Just as John Wesley exemplified this commitment through his ministry among an increasing prison population of his day, United Methodists today are called to minister in this often forgotten section of our society. The need for prison chaplains is greater than ever before with more than 2 million people incarcerated in the United States. The General Board of Higher Education and Ministry (GBHEM) and the United Methodist Higher Education Foundation (UMHEF) ask that you consider a gift in order to help meet the critical need for prison chaplains across our nation.

In 2005, GBHEM and the UMHEF partnered to establish the Coleman Tyson Siekman (CTS) Prison Chaplain Scholarship Endowment, which is designed to foster a new generation of young men and women who would commit themselves to sharing the liberating love of God with those who have lost their freedom.

This scholarship is the only Correctional Chaplain Scholarship fund in the UMC and honors three outstanding United Methodist Chaplains: Judy Coleman, Charles Tyson and Barbara Hart-Siekman. Their ministries were marked by compassion, persistence and imagination. They opened doors, built bridges, set standards, changed hearts and changed institutions. Their legacy is leadership and hope.

The CTS Prison Scholarship Endowment will enable seminary students as well as clergy to gain the necessary skills to serve effectively in this highly complex ministry – but it is in need of $1,400 before it can begin receiving applications from those interested in practicing full-time ministry in a correctional setting. Your donation can make a difference in their lives. Won’t you give today?

Richmond Stoglin

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Visit us online at umcrjc.org

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Patron Saint banner: St. John the Apostle

This banner was presented to Chaplain Rich Stoglin at St. John The Apostle United Methodist Church, in celebration of his vision and work to establish a Redemption Church in Arlington. The banner depicts St. John the Apostle – evangelist and gospel writer. The background is the account in the book of Acts of John’s arrest and imprisonment, along with Peter, for preaching the gospel. The apostle is holding a copy of the gospel which states the Word become flesh.

It was St. John and Peter who went ahead to make preparations for the final meal Jesus shared on earth (Passover).  As the “disciple whom Jesus loved”, John alone remained at Jesus’ feet along with the women when Jesus was crucified.  He later cared for Mary as his mother to fulfill Jesus’ request as he died.  Who better to emulate?  We can follow his example as we take brothers, sisters, uncles, aunts, mother’s and fathers into God’s care at Redemption Church in Arlington.

Designed and hand crafted by Amy Krueger, this banner depicts St. John the Apostle as the patron saint of the Redemption Church in honor of the support and work that members of St. John the Apostle have given to Chaplain Stoglin in his efforts to launch a Redemption Church here in Arlington.

It shall target ex-offenders and their families after their release from prison and provides both a safe place to worship for the ex-offender along with training in how to live productively in society and within an established congregation.

The Redemption Church model was developed and implemented by the Justice and Mercy Ministries of the Oklahoma Conference of The UMC.

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Visit us online at umcrjc.org

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Opening a Redemption Church in Arlington: Meeting at TCC April 28, 2010

First and foremost, thanks to TCC Southeast campus for hosting our first Discussion regarding “The Opening of a Redemption Church in Arlington, Texas.”  Their generous interest and involvement is greatly appreciated.

Want to know more about our panelists?  Click here for their biographies.

Chaplain Richmond Stoglin welcomes everyone and the meeting begins…

After a brief welcome by Chaplain Stoglin, we were introduced to O.K. Carter, our moderator, who shared with us a story of how his cousin was rejected by churches because of his prison past.

O.K. Carter

Moving from left to right, Mr. Carter asked the panelists to provide a short opening statement regarding the role of the church, congregations and the community.

Barbara Elias-Perciful, J.D.,

Rev. Dr. Michael A Evan, Sr.,

Rev. Steve Langford, D. Min. 

  • Rev. Langford:  reluctance to embrace says more about the church than the individual.  This type of relationship is a two-way learning street
  • Rev. Evan:  congregation should be accepting, open, loving, and given responsibility to help with: socialization, employment, housing, etc., needs of the ex-offender. The ex-offender also has the responsibility to accept what the church would and should provide.
  • B. Perciful, J.D.:  it provides a benefit to the community and measures would be in place to keep children safe.

Rev. Dr. Stan Basler

James E. Hawthorne, Jr.

  • J. Hawthorne, Jr.:  the faith-based community plays a large role.  Paying for more prisons just does not work.  It is better to pay money on the front end instead of keeping the “punishment” mind set.
  • Rev. Basler:  the model used for Redemption Church in Oklahoma was Church of Gethsemene in New York and Newgate in Beaumont.  We saw a need, collaborated with organizations for jobs, etc.  Click here for an article about Redemption Church.

Lucille C. Johnson

Richmond Stoglin

Jimmy Walker

  • Rev. Melinda Veatch (not pictured):  The church can address homelessness and deep spiritual needs that are not being met by the community.  We come together on an equal plane in the eyes of God; a transition place and net of support that is not there.
  • J. Walker:  a GED program for ex-offenders would benefit both the ex-offender and the community.  It costs $45,000 to incarcerate verses $7,000 to educate – persons up to 72 years of age have benefitted from GED.
  • L. Johnson:   there are multiple programs that could help churches work effectively in the community.

  Mark Dolive of TCC stopped by to welcome us to the campus.

The panelists responded to questions from the floor.  Here is a synopsis:

What behavioral outcomes can be achieved?

  • Much of what we want for the ex-offenders should occur while they are incarcerated.  We should collaborate with other groups.  Counseling or access to it is needed because many offenders were abused as children.
  • Networking, partnerships, collaboration with other entities that have a proven track record of success is important.
  • The church needs to move beyond behavior towards character > character development > discover healthy sense of self > healthy relationships.
  • Support the ex-offender in their re-entry needs.  Many organizations provide services and collaborating with them would be beneficial.
  • A lot of the behaviors come from the way we view others; embracing people and showing them that we care.
  • Change fear on both sides; taking action that is opposite to the fear.  It is a transformative vehicle – put differences aside.
  • Programs in prison address exterior behaviors in a prison environment.  Support and accountability is necessary.  It is also important to address criminal associations, concrete thinking, and dependency matters.
  • It is important to consider what churches need to do to be accepting of ex-offenders in their congregations: the call of Christ to the Kingdom where every person is valued – failure is OK; find a place to belong where you are valued.  Move beyond “what is in it for me” – towards an inclusive “what does it mean for me and mine”.
  • Realize and be reminded that all have sinned and are in need of redemption, leadership: laity and clergy.  Remind congregations of this fact; “if not but for the grace of God”.  Perfect people don’t exist.
  • Faith tends to be private – referring to personal safety and culture.  self righteousness excuses us from compassion.
  • Not realizing limitations of congregations can be problematic.  Changing attitudes can take years of consistent effort.  Training in boundary issues is also required.

How do you address the issue of child abuse?

  • Deal directly with that problem and let them know that they cannot go into certain places or associate with certain people
  • That question is rooted in fear.
  • Intentionality on how we live in relationship – train people to relate appropriately.

Is it harder to educate the public about ex-offenders, or more difficult for the ex-offender to accept unconditional love and acceptance?

  • It is necessary to take baby steps and tell the stories with the ex-offenders.  Educating the public would be more difficult.  Since congregants are not forced to listen to sermons, it starts with the way we model it.
  • The role the incarcerated play in society is that we need them to feel better about ourselves.

What are you going to do about people going back in all the time?

  • Find out what other entities are doing, what programs work and build on that.

What about mental health issues?

  • We can integrate public health organizations while approach those individuals in a more understanding way.  We need to be more open to collaboration; across denominational lines and beyond religious organizations.
  • Support and accountability
  • It is labor intensive work.  There is no instant gratification
  • We must work in an environment of mutual respect and understanding.

    
Alan Bean, Steve Langford, and Melinda Veatch at St Andrews UMC.

St. Andrews was gracious enough to host our delicious lunch which was enjoyed by all.

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Visit us online at umcrjc.org

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The First Annual Round Table Discussion, April 28, 2010: Panelist Bios

The Opening of a Redemption Church
in Arlington, TX

Biographies (in alphabetical order)

Rev. Dr. Stan Basler

Stan Basler was appointed Conference Director of Criminal Justice and Mercy Ministries in June of 1994. He served as Associate Pastor of First United Methodist of Muskogee from August of 1990 until June of 1994.

Reverend Basler received a Doctor or Ministry Degree from Saint Paul School of Theology in May of 2000 and a Masters of Divinity degree, Magna Cum Laude, from Phillips Graduate Seminary in Tulsa in 1992. He received a Juris Doctor from the University of Kansas School of Law in 1977 and a Bachelor of Arts in Letters from the University of Oklahoma in 1969.

He practiced law in Kansas as his primary vocation from 1977-1990. He also served as Montgomery County, Kansas Commissioner from 1983-1987.

As a practicing lawyer, he represented adults and juveniles in the legal system. As a County Commissioner, he worked with the planning of a new jail, jail administrative and correctional issues, and community corrections alternatives.

He was ordained an elder in the United Methodist Church in June of 1994 and ordained deacon in June of 1991. He was a licensed lay speaker in the Kansas East Conference of the United Methodist Church from 1986-1990, when he was appointed to pastor St. James United Methodist Church in Coffeyville, Kansas.

In Muskogee, he was involved in ministry to prison populations at Eddie Warrior Correctional Center, Jess Dunn Correctional Center and the Muskogee Community Correctional Center. While he was president of Muskogee Cooperative Ministries, that organization forged a partnership ministry with the Muskogee area Probation and Parole office.

He has served on eleven Kairos Prison Ministry teams in Oklahoma and has been spiritual director for eight of them. Reverend Basler is also an approved trainer of volunteers for Prison Fellowship Ministries.

Furthermore, Reverend Basler has served as chair of the Oklahoma Conference of Churches Criminal Justice and Corrections Task Force and chair of the Interfaith Commission on Prison Ministry. He is co-pastor of Redemption Church, Oklahoma City, a church fellowship of prisoners, ex-prisoners and their families.

He also served as an adjunct professor at Oklahoma City University School of Law where he taught a course in Restorative Justice.

He is married and has two daughters.

 

Dr. T. Bowman

Theron L. Bowman began his law enforcement career in 1983 as an officer with the Arlington (TX) Police Department, and served in numerous positions before being appointed chief of police in 1999.

Chief Bowman received three degrees from the University of Texas at Arlington, a bachelor’s in biology in 1983, a master’s in public administration in 1991 and a doctorate in urban and public administration in 1997. He is a

graduate of the FBI National Academy – Session 186, the FBI National Executive Institute, and the Senior Management Institute for Police. Chief Bowman is active in several local and state and international law enforcement organizations.

Currently, he serves as a Commissioner for The Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies, chair of the Texas Intelligence Council and the Texas Regional Center for Policing Innovation. He is a member of the International Association of Chiefs of Police, where he serves on the Executive Committee, Financial Review Committee, Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs Committee, and the IACP Foundation.

Chief Bowman is a popular speaker who addresses all age groups. He has served as a lecturer, instructor, adjunct professor and visiting fellow for several colleges and universities. He is a Deacon in his affiliated church, serves on numerous community advisory boards, and has several publications and professional reports to his credit.

Chief Bowman has received the Police Executive Research Forum’s Gary P Hayes Award, the John Ben Shepperd Public Leadership Institute Outstanding Local Leader Award, the Distinguished Alumni Award from UT Arlington, and Leadership Arlington’s Sally Kallam Award. He and his wife, Denise, and three children live in Arlington. They co-own and operate several private ventures, including a popular Fort Worth restaurant.

 

O.K. Carter

O.K. Carter is currently a communication professor at the University of Texas at Arlington, where he teaches creative nonfiction and reporting.

For more than 30 years (prior to his academic career) Carter was a self-described “newspaper guy”, a columnist, editorial writer and publisher of the Star-telegram’s Arlington edition.  He is the author of more than 11,000 editorials or columns, as well as more than 1,000 magazine articles. He was also the co-host of a local TV news show that aired more than 500 episodes. He’s considered a leading expert on regional history.

He lives in Arlington, where he currently serves on the boards of The River Legacy Foundation, Downtown Arlington Management Corp. and UTA’s Liberal Arts Advisory Board.

 

Barbara Elias-Perciful, J.D.

Barbara Elias-Perciful is the President of Texas Loves Children, Inc., the Director of Texas Lawyers for Children, and also represents abused and neglected children as their court-appointed attorney and/or guardian ad litem. She graduated second in her class from Southern Methodist University School of Law in 1984. Barbara entered private practice and then, after taking a pro bono appointment to represent an abused child in 1993, she chose to leave “big firm life” to start a solo practice focusing exclusively on child abuse issues. Barbara was distressed to see the enormous disparity in resources, training opportunities, and access to mentors and experts available to lawyers and judges in commercial cases and those involved in child protection cases.

Thus, in 1995, Barbara founded Texas Loves Children, Inc. (TLC), the nonprofit organization through which she planned and coordinated training programs for judges and attorneys on critical child abuse issues. In 2004, through TLC, Barbara launched the Texas Lawyers for Children Online Legal Resource and Communication Center, which includes a comprehensive child abuse library containing legal, medical, and psychological information, all organized by topic; secure, private communication tools allowing judges and attorneys to discuss best practices and court improvement and share expertise; and a pro bono attorney network that connects children’s court-appointed attorneys with mentors in areas such as immigration law. This online center serves almost 1500 legal professionals in Texas who handle the cases of almost 57,000 children and is positioned to be a national model. TLC replicated its online center model for the State of California, and, through the Improving Outcomes Network (located at http://www.ImprovingOutcomesNetwork.org), Barbara provides free consultation to other states and organizations interested in creating an online vehicle for sharing best practice information. Additionally, Barbara serves as the Chair of the Texas State Bar Committee on Child Abuse and Neglect and is a member of the Collaborative Council for the Texas Supreme Court’s Commission for Children, Youth and Families.

In 2009, Barbara was one of two lawyers in the U.S. to receive the American Bar Association’s 2009 Child Advocacy Award. For more information about Texas Loves Children, Inc., visit www.TexasLovesChildren.org.

 

Rev. Dr. Michael A Evans, Sr.

Michael A. Evans, Sr. born the oldest of 6 children, on November 4, 1966, is a native of Houston, TX. He is the proud pastor of the Bethlehem Baptist Church of Mansfield, TX where he has proudly served for nearly 20 years as the “Under Shepherd.” He is married to Mrs. Lisa C. Evans, his High School sweetheart of more than 20 years. To this union they have two children, Michael “Tony” Evans, Jr. and Richard Isaac “Tiger” Evans.

Pastor Evans received his Bachelor of Arts in Political Science (Pre-Law) from the University of Texas at Arlington. He received his Master of Divinity degree from Texas Christian University’s Brite Divinity School. He has participated in doctoral studies at Southern Methodist University’s Perkins School of Theology and Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary. He received his Doctor of Ministry degree from Baylor University’s Truett Theological Seminary.

Pastor Evans has served as an administrator with the Tarrant County College District with coordination and oversight responsibilities for the district’s ESL and Adult Basic Education Centers. He has served as the City of Arlington’s Annual Martin Luther King Jr. speaker on three separate occasions; as a consultant on Race Relations for church, county and state officials; as a Reserve Chaplain in the United States Navy as a commissioned officer; as a Mansfield Community Advocate, he is the founder of the BBC Educational Enrichment Corporation, which has served more than 1,000 young people throughout the Southeast Arlington-Mansfield-Kennedale area with tutoring services, career exploration and summer job placement; director of the Life Touch Cottage Ministries Inc. (A Christian Education and Evangelism Organization serving children and youth in Ilorin, Kwara State, Nigeria – West Africa); founder of the Hope House Community Service Network that serves indigent individuals in Southeast Tarrant County with addiction recovery, medical services and transportation needs; also founder of the Historic West Mansfield Community Development Corporation: the goal of the CDC is to encourage quality economic development of the Historic West Mansfield Community. Pastor Evans is the former Director of African American Ministries for the Baptist General Convention of Texas that involved service to over 800 churches statewide. Recently, He was inducted to the City of Mansfield’s Wall of Honor for 2007; an award reserved for outstanding service for the city, her people, and the surrounding communities. He now serves on the Board of Trustees of the Mansfield Independent School District. He is serving on numerous boards and spear heads many community initiatives locally and state wide.

However, in humble regard for all that God has done he praises God for all of His love and kindness.

 

James E. Hawthorne, Jr.

James Hawthorne is currently employed by the Arlington Police Department where he serves as Deputy Police Chief over the Community Support Bureau. He has held numerous job assignments since joining the department in 1985, including Media Relations Supervisor and Team Leader for the Police Hostage Negotiation Team.

Chief Hawthorne has lectured on a state and national level on hostage negotiation, media and crisis management. Hawthorne has received numerous citizen commendations and community recognitions including:

A. Maceo Smith Community Service Award – Alpha Phi Alpha
Adjunct of the Year – The University of Texas at Arlington
Thurgood Marshall Award for Law Enforcement Excellence – NAACP
Distingushed Alumni – Fort Worth, Texas Independent School District
Outstanding African-American Alumni – The University of Texas at Arlington

He is a graduate of the FBI National Academy in Quantico, VA. as well as the Senior Management Institute for Police sponsored by Harvard University and the Police Executive Research Forum in Boston, MA. Additionally, he is a graduate of the University of Texas at Arlington. He will obtain his Master’s Degree in Criminology, in spring 2010.

Chief Hawthorne is a member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. He and his wife Stephanie, live in Arlington with their two children Tamorah and Brian.

 

Lucille C. Johnson

Current Responsibilities:

Assistant to the Executive Director
Director of Public Affairs Department
North Central Texas Council of Governments
Adjunct Professor, University of Texas at Arlington
School of Urban and Public Affairs

Professional Experience:

Develop and implement activities in the Executive Director’s Office, including the facilitation of regional roundtables for local government professionals; management and coordination of a HUD funded community development work study program (locally known as the Urban Fellowship Program – funding scholarships and internships for students pursuing masters degrees in community building programs); administrator for the Texas Grant Review and Comment System for North Central Texas and liaison to the Governor’s office; provide technical assistance for 240 member governments in North Central Texas (includes cities, counties, school districts, and special districts); create and publish surveys for North Central Texas; facilitate annual newly elected mayors and council members workshop; agency representative throughout North Central Texas and speaker across the State; and serve on the United Way of Tarrant County’s Income Strategic Design Group and newly created Income Council to improve lives and change community conditions through an income support strategy resulting in low-income working families’ increased ability to receive public, private and informal income supports and subsidies that are available to them.

Director of the agency’s Public Affairs Department. Responsible for staff writing; newsletters, brochures, and publication productions; press releases; and the graphics design department. Also manage the agency’s storefront and customer service areas.

Adjunct Professor, University of Texas at Arlington. Teach an internship class for master’s students in Public Administration, Urban Affairs, and City Planning. Class is designed to integrate work experience and coursework through a series of work-related assignments, presentations by local planning and management practitioners, professional development seminars, and class discussions and exercises.

Education:

University of Texas at Arlington
Masters of Public Administration, December 1992
Mississippi State University
Masters Business Administration, May 1981
Mississippi State University
B.S. Business Administration, December 1976
Minor: Accounting

Professional Memberships:

North Texas City Management Association
Texas City Management Association
Phi Alpha Alpha Honor Society
Texas Association of Municipal Information Officers

 

Rev. Steve Langford, D. Min.

Family:

Married to Etta Briscoe Langford, January 10, 1970
Father of Josh (1976)), Jon (1979), Justin (1983)
Grandfather of Damon (2001), Lillian (2002), Scarlett (2005)

Education:

1971 – B.A., Howard Payne University, Brownwood, Texas
Majors: New Testament Greek, Religious Knowledge (Theology)

1973 – M. Div., Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, Fort Worth
Major focus: Greek New Testament, Pastoral Ministries

1994 – D. Min., Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, Fort Worth
Major focus: Hebrew Bible

D. Min. project: Equipping Believers with a Hermeneutical and Theological
Foundation for Exercising Spiritual Discernment

Post graduate studies:

Methodist Studies, Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary
2 Year Academy for Spiritual Formation, 2001-2003
I have served on leadership teams for the 5 Day Academy, based on the 2 Year model.
Family Systems, Lombard Mennonite Peace Center, Lombard, Illinois
Clergy Clinic in Family Emotional Processes
Advanced Clergy Clinic in Family Emotional Processes
Mediation Skills Training Institute, SMU-Legacy
Family Systems studies under Dr. Doug Hester, Dr. Terry Germann

Ministry:

1969 – ordained in Southern Baptist life; served 20 years in that denomination
1993 – received as a member of the Central Texas Conference by recognition of orders
1991-2000, Director of Lay Ministries, First United Methodist Church, Round Rock
2000-2002, pastor, Cogdell United Methodist Church, Waco
2002-2010, pastor, St. John the Apostle United Methodist Church, Arlington

Self-understanding:

The Lord God has given me the tongue of a teacher, that I may know how to sustain the weary with a word.
Morning by morning he wakens – wakens my ear to listen as those who are taught (Isaiah 40:4).

I am a teacher whose passion is spiritual formation, grounded in Biblical studies. Grace is central in my theology. Grace is rooted in the character of God as revealed in both Hebrew and Christian scriptures, supremely in the person of Jesus of Nazareth – the Christ. The experience of God’s grace leads to personal transformation and maturity (emotional-spiritual-relational) and, thereby, to living the ways of God in the world so that the Kingdom may come on earth.

I am . . .

a follower of a servant Lord,
for whom the grace proclaimed and embodied in Jesus is central,
a child of God who is being transformed by the grace of God,
called to proclaim the things of God that Jesus taught (the Kingdom).

 

Chaplain Richmond Earl Stoglin

Chaplain Richmond E. Stoglin retired after 22 years and 10 months from the United States Department of Justice, Federal Bureau of Prisons, Federal Medical Center, Fort Worth, Texas, on January 31, 2007. His last position was Department Head of Religious Services. Chaplain Stoglin serves his country in the United States Navy Reserve Chaplain Corp since November 30, 1985. He has attained the rank of Commander and is currently the Regimental Chaplain to the 14th Marines, the largest artillery command in the US Marines Corps.

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND:

Bachelor of Science-University of Wisconsin at River Falls, May 1979, History and Political Science
Master of Divinity-Gammon Theological Seminary (ITC), Atlanta, Georgia, May 1982
Master of Public Administration-University of Texas at Arlington,
January 1992, Policy Development
Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, 1992
Doctor of Ministry-United Theological Seminary, Dayton, Ohio, May 2003, Pastoral Counseling Administration

PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS:

National Naval Officers Association-Life Member
Naval Reserve Officers Association-Life Member
International Critical Incident Stress Foundation, Inc.
Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.-Life Member

DENOMINATIONAL AFFILIATION:

United Methodist Church-Ordained Elder

NOTABLE ACHIEVEMENTS:

Outstanding Young Men of America-1989
Appointment to the Department of Justice, Federal Bureau of Prisons’ National Task Force – The Impact of Incarceration on the African American Family
Outstanding African American Alumnus of University of Texas at Arlington-1997
National Chaplain for the National Naval Officers’ Association-1997-1998
Leadership Arlington-May 2000
National Organization for Victim’s Assistance Training for Trainers Institute-July 2001
Elected as the National Constituency Representative for Prisons/Correctional Settings of the United Methodist Church from 2000-to 2007

DISTINGUISED MILITARY RECOGNITIONS:

Fleet Marine Force (FMF Pin) Qualified Officer by Marine Special Operations Command (MARSOC) 8 August 2008

Navy Commendation Medal by the Secretary of the Navy for Meritorious Service while serving at Headquarters and Support Battalion MCB, Camp Lejeune, NC, promoting spiritual growth and increasing morale. Additionally, he served as Brig Chaplain July 2007-April 2008. He served as Pastoral Leader for two major operations; Operation Thunder, the battalion’s version of Extreme Home-Makeover for a retired terminally ill Marine and family and Operation Must Assist which provided 30 Marine families in need with a holiday meal and gifts.

Navy Commendation Medal by the Secretary of the Navy for Meritorious Service while serving as Coordinator of Logistics and Director of Field Studies for the Small Unit Leadership Warrior Training/Unit Cohesion Training Program 10 August 2005 to 1 March 2006.

Navy Commendation Medal by the Secretary of the Navy for Meritorious Service regarding creating a Chaplain Crisis Management Team Program. This program enables Chaplain’s worldwide to offer helpful and productive Crisis Intervention to their Commands in case of mishaps, natural or terrorist

Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal by the Secretary of the Navy for Professional Achievement while serving as Casualty Assistance Calls Program Chaplain for the Guana Family in the loss of their son, Timothy, a Sailor on the USS Cole

Outstanding Volunteer Medal
National Defense Medal
Project Officer for the Inaugural Joint Chaplains Conference (Army, Air Force and Navy)
Facilitated NAVAIRES Chaplain’s Conference with the Deputy Chief of Chaplains on Critical Incident Stress Debriefing

PUBLICATIONS:

Why I Am A Prison Chaplain, Official Publication of the Section of Chaplains & Related Ministries of the United Methodist Church
We Need Each Other- (Sermon) Pulpit Digest Journal
Winds and Chimes- Poetry
And What Are Dreams-Poetry
I Was In Prison-Book (November 2008)

PERSONAL:

He enjoys running, kickboxing, reading, writing, public speaking and volunteering for charitable causes. Chaplain Stoglin is married to Reecia (Re’) and they have Breezy, an Italian Greyhound.

 

Rev. Melinda Veatch

Rev. Melinda Veatch is the Executive Director of Tarrant Area Community of Churches, located in Fort Worth, Texas. TACC is an interdenominational organization that gathers churches in the Tarrant area to address unmet

needs in Tarrant County. Congregational groups involved in TACC include African Methodist Episcopal, Assemblies of God, Baptist, Catholic, Christian Methodist Episcopal, Disciples of Christ, Episcopal, Lutheran,

Presbyterian, United Methodist, United Church of Christ. TACC especially focuses on issues related to homelessness. Since the transition from incarceration back to open society is one of those issues, we are

particularly interested in learning more about how congregations can be a positive and helpful part of that transition.

Rev. Veatch is a Presbyterian Minister, ordained in 1996. She served in a parish setting for 10 years engaging in educational ministries, congregational fellowship, mission outreach, and community ministry as well as worship and preaching. She is a graduate of Austin College in Sherman, Texas, and Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary in Austin, Texas. She lives in Fort Worth with her husband, Glen Ely, a PhD graduate of Texas Christian University.

 

Jimmy Walker

Jimmy Walker was named Assistant Superintendent of Administration on April 16, 2009. He began his career with the Arlington Independent School District in 1993 as an Assistant Principal at Carter Junior High School. He served in that capacity for 3 years. In June 1996 he moved to Martin High School as an Assistant Principal, and served in that capacity for 4 years. In June 2000 he was appointed Principal of Bailey Junior High School where he served for 9 years. During his 9 years as instructional leader at Bailey, his school was recognized by the Texas Business and Education Coalition and the Just for Kids organization as one of the top 33 middle/junior high schools in the state. Bailey received this honor three out of the nine years he served as Principal. Mr. Walker received his BS degree from East Central University and his Masters in Administration from Northeastern State University.

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State of Purpose: Theme – Working for mercy while creating justice

Here are Chaplain Richmond Stoglin’s opening remarks from our February 24, 2010 meeting at St. John The Apostle United Methodist Church.  For those who could not attend the meeting, it serves to illustrate the focus and direction of the UMC Restorative Justice Center.  For those who were able to attend, here is a refresher:

 

Let me preface my remarks this morning by thanking each of you for attending the 2nd Annual UMC Restorative Justice Center meeting. In spite of your very busy  schedules and huge responsibilities you chose to be here today.

Thank You—give yourselves a hand—please!!

The purpose of the UMC Restorative Justice Center is to become the premiere think tank on criminal justice issues for the United Methodist Church. It is our prominent concern about the United Methodist Church’s position on criminal justice issues, however, we are not just concerned about United Methodist, as we are interested in collaborative efforts with other religious communities and organizations with good track records. As evidenced by your presence here today.

WHY ARE WE HERE?

  1. The late Pope John Paul II in his statement to the Catholic Bishops of the United States Conference on responsibility, rehabilitation and restoration: A Catholic perspective on Crime and Criminal Justice Conference dated July 9, 2000 challenged them by stating: We are still a long way from the time when our conscience can be certain of having done everything possible to prevent crime and control it effectively so that it no longer does harm and at the same time, to offer to those who commit crimes away of redeeming themselves and making a positive return to society. If all those in some way in the problem tried to …develop this line of thought, perhaps humanity as a whole could take a great step forward in creating a more serene and peaceful society.
  2. The Book of Resolutions of the United Methodist Church dated 1996 regarding the United States Criminal Justice system proclaims the following: The administration of the Criminal Justice System has reached a level of saturation that leads to the expediency rather than the even-handed application of justice and punishment. As United Methodist Christians, we are called upon to sensitize those institutions that operate within the criminal justice system to be responsible, more humane and just to ensure the full participation in society by those who have deviated from laws established as normative guidelines for behavior. (pp552-553)
  3. Our capital system is haunted by the demon of error: error in determining the guilt and determining who among the guilty deserves to die. What effect was race having? What effect was poverty having? Until I can be sure with moral certainty, that no innocent man or woman is facing lethal injection, no one will meet that fate. (George Ryan, former Governor of Illinois) An honest look of capital punishment must be done. Recently in Dallas County, Texas more than ten men have been released as a result of DNA testing. Most of them where serving long sentences or worse, the death penalty.
  4. To quote Ronnie Earle, the longtime former district attorney for Travis County (Austin), Texas acknowledged: Our incarceration policies are a threat to democracy. They create in our midst a virtual separate nation of the disenfranchised, with few prospects, whose children are probably doomed to follow in their footsteps. We can take away their freedom for periods of time and they will get over it, but when we take away their hope, we take away our safety! Consequently, it is little wonder demand for space for prison construction has become a top priority for many governors throughout this country. And faced with the global economic crisis this problem is more than likely going to increase exponentially. As each year passes the current number of two million people incarcerated is bound to double unless a constructive alternative prevails.
  5. Perhaps, the author of the quote was correct when he said: You can tell a society by its prisons. It was the Quakers in 1790 who approached the political leaders in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania with a proposal to help the incarcerated (many of whom were imprisoned for debt) while assisting the state with its growing prison population. The Quakers termed what they were doing as penitence work. Thus, the word, penitentiary means: house of penitence. The Quakers attempted to carry out this whole mission until the state eventually overwhelmed them with too many inmates , very little funding and too little space to work, sounds familiar? Eventually, the Quakers turned the penitentiary back to the state. Incidentally, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania kept that facility functional until 1970. That prison was named the Eastern State Penitentiary. (More information is available in the book Race To Incarcerate by Marc Maurer)

You have come from Seattle, Washington, Washington, DC, The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Missouri, Tennessee, Oklahoma, Houston and across the Dallas/Fort Worth metroplex on your own with limited budgets and great areas of responsibilities while not having enough time. But come you did! And if there was a way to compensate you, I certainly would. But for now, consider this an IOU. Because with God’s help and your highly developed skill sets; effective today, we are going to make a huge difference in this country and beyond. This is why we have themed this year’s meeting: Working For Mercy While Creating Justice; an apt description of our courageous endeavors.

A few of the future plans I will elaborate on while my partner, The Reverend Doctor Stan Basler will expand on them as the keynote speaker during lunch today.

  1. Act as an Information Clearing House for the UMC on Correctional Criminal Justice Issues.
  2. Assist with raising funds for the CTS Scholarship Fund. Our goal is one million dollars for the CTS Scholarship because it is the only national correctional scholarship in the UMC. Although, the United Methodist Church still does not have a Juvenile Justice Chaplain, since June 2005.
  3. Establish a permanent headquarters for the UMC Restorative Justice Center in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Establish a Redemption Church, a house of worship for ex-offenders and their families in Arlington, Texas. Our primary objective is to mainstream them after a thorough process into mainline Christian churches.
  4. Create and expand partnerships with interested and willing United Methodists and other religious communities on sponsoring regional criminal justice summits, first being Spring 2011 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.
  5. Partner with willing United Methodist initially, and eventually expand with other religious communities to establish A Truth and Reconciliation Forum for ex-offenders, victims of crime, correctional administrators, judicial officials, law enforcement executives, juvenile officials and active religious criminal justice leaders.
  6. Create and maintain a permanent data base of United Methodist Churches and Criminal Justice volunteers and their training programs.
  7. Establish a national training program for future correctional, juvenile and jail setting chaplains. Partner with the Sentencing Project located in Washington, D.C. and sponsor a bi-annual criminal justice summit. Its objective is to help the public understand the prominent role the church has in the history of criminal justice issues.
  8. Publish an annual report for religious and secular press on “The State of the US Criminal Justice System and the UM Church.”

We will be the epicenter of critical transformation as United Methodist Christians in the 21st century!! We will through the workings of the Holy Spirit have the power to bless and the authority to affirm this movement. We are in effect, engaging society through operational transformation. This is why we will not seek government funding. We have no political agenda. We will work with others whose groundings are moral and core values are not up for compromise. Part of this transformation process will be actualized today during the open discussion and the brain storming session. As indicated in your communications after about 50 minutes of brainstorming this afternoon, we will return here for review of your ideas/recommendations. We will then take those ideas form them into a draft for your review . Once the feedback is returned, we will then through the able assistance of some very gifted persons—publish them as a final report to all attendees of this meeting.

The late Reverend Richard John Neuhaus was correct—“People of faith, have a right to speak in the public square.” And speak and act, we will. But we will speak with intelligence, conviction, passion and faith. What we are about to undertake will not be popular. It will not be easy. We are all faced with great opportunities…brilliantly disguised as impossible situations. (Bits and Pieces, August 18, 1984). There comes a time, “when silence is betrayal.” The United Methodist Church has waited too long. It is our time, as the UMC Justice Office to pray, organize, activate and open our office for business. We must act to serve as the 21st century Apostle Paul speaking truth to those who need to hear it. Remember, people are not moved until they know you care. And this circle of people here cares.

At the end of the day, we must decide where do we go from here? And what is our level of commitment to ensure that we are “working for mercy while creating justice.”

The late Mother Teresa when asked by a young arrogant Western reporter why she worked so hard after winning the Nobel Peace Prize stated: I am a pencil in the hands of God, and whatever He wants me to write, I will write. Today, we who have assembled here are pencils. What course of action we will take determines who determines our penmanship.

This is why we have Deacon Leonard Sanchez from the Roman Catholic Church, Betsey Neely from the United Methodist Higher Education Foundation, Nashville, TN, Mike Backman from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Dorie Heckman from the Western Pennsylvania United Methodist Conference, Ramona Curtis from the Academy for Leader Development and Civic Engagement-Baylor University, Rev. Milton Pace of Saintsville Cathedral who provides 10,000 meals per month to inner city residents, Rev. Dr. Alan Bean of Friends of Justice, Barbara Elias-Perciful, who could have continued practicing with a prestigious law firm, but chose to represent young people who have been abandoned by society. Dr. T. Bowman, our police chief, who has a lot on his platter inclusive of planning for the 2011 Super Bowl here in Arlington, Texas. My partner, the Rev. Dr. Stan Basler, today’s keynote speaker, Don Fowler, computer engineer, who could be out designing systems, Rev. Dr. Clinton McNair from Seattle University, and Allen Rice, whose story as a fifth generation United Methodist was kicked out of a church for the services he had been providing to ex-offenders. It is Allen Rice who believes what we are doing here is the next Civil Rights Movement and I concur.

To our discussion leaders, some of who are our speakers, but especially to those whose schedules are thick with events, but you chose to be here today—Dr. Tracey McKenzie, who was recently recognized in Washington, DC for an academic award of Community College Professors of the Year, The Rev. Dr. Mike Evans, Dr. James Shopshire (my former seminary professor)!!! And Lucille Johnson, Vice-President for Public Affairs, NTCOG. Thank You, Our VIP Observers and attendees again thank you for coming!!

Marc Maurer, author of Race to Incarcerate states:

“Rather than looking for a political hero to lead us out of this wilderness, we would do better to consider how we might mobilize a greater constellation of forces to demand a more constructive approach.”

Finally, as a United Methodist Chaplain, Let us hear what the word of God says:

“Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? Shall tribulation, or distress or persecution or famine, or nakedness, or peril or sword? As it is written, for thy sake we are being killed all the daylong; we are regarded as sheep to be slaughtered. No, in all these things we are more than conquerors through him who loved us. For I am sure that neither death, nor life, nor angles, nor principalities, nor things present, nor things to come, nor powers, nor height, nor depth, nor anything else shall in all creation be able to separate us from the love of God in Christ Jesus our Lord.” (Romans 8:35-39, RSV Oxford Annotated Bible)

Let us, begin this great work and not look back!

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Here is Chaplain Stoglin’s Bio as presented at the meeting:

Chaplain Richmond Earl Stoglin

Chaplain Richmond E. Stoglin retired after 22 years and 10 months from the United States Department of Justice, Federal Bureau of Prisons, Federal Medical Center, Fort Worth, Texas, on January 31, 2007. His last position was Department Head of Religious Services. Chaplain Stoglin serves his country in the United States Navy Reserve Chaplain Corp since November 30, 1985. He has attained the rank of Commander and is currently the Regimental Chaplain to the 14th Marines, the largest artillery command in the US Marines Corps.

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND

Bachelor of Science-University of Wisconsin at River Falls, May 1979, History and Political Science
Master of Divinity-Gammon Theological Seminary (ITC), Atlanta, Georgia, May 1982
Master of Public Administration-University of Texas at Arlington,
January 1992, Policy Development
Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, 1992
Doctor of Ministry-United Theological Seminary, Dayton, Ohio, May 2003, Pastoral Counseling Administration

PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

National Naval Officers Association-Life Member
Naval Reserve Officers Association-Life Member
International Critical Incident Stress Foundation, Inc.
Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.-Life Member

DENOMINATIONAL AFFILIATION

United Methodist Church-Ordained Elder

Chaplain Richmond Earl Stoglin

NOTABLE ACHIEVEMENTS

Outstanding Young Men of America-1989
Appointment to the Department of Justice, Federal Bureau of Prisons’ National Task Force – The Impact of Incarceration on the African American Family
Outstanding African American Alumnus of University of Texas at Arlington-1997
National Chaplain for the National Naval Officers’ Association-1997-1998
Leadership Arlington-May 2000
National Organization for Victim’s Assistance Training for Trainers Institute-July 2001
Elected as the National Constituency Representative for Prisons/Correctional Settings of the United Methodist Church from 2000-to 2007

DISTINGUISED MILITARY RECOGNITIONS

Fleet Marine Force (FMF Pin) Qualified Officer by Marine Special Operations Command (MARSOC) 8 August 2008

Navy Commendation Medal by the Secretary of the Navy for Meritorious Service while serving at Headquarters and Support Battalion MCB, Camp Lejeune, NC, promoting spiritual growth and increasing morale. Additionally, he served as Brig Chaplain July 2007-April 2008. He served as Pastoral Leader for two major operations; Operation Thunder, the battalion’s version of Extreme Home-Makeover for a retired terminally ill Marine and family and Operation Must Assist which provided 30 Marine families in need with a holiday meal and gifts.

Navy Commendation Medal by the Secretary of the Navy for Meritorious Service while serving as Coordinator of Logistics and Director of Field Studies for the Small Unit Leadership Warrior Training/Unit Cohesion Training Program 10 August 2005 to 1 March 2006.

Navy Commendation Medal by the Secretary of the Navy for Meritorious Service regarding creating a Chaplain Crisis Management Team Program. This program enables Chaplain’s worldwide to offer helpful and productive Crisis Intervention to their Commands in case of mishaps, natural or terrorist

Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal by the Secretary of the Navy for Professional Achievement while serving as Casualty Assistance Calls Program Chaplain for the Guana Family in the loss of their son, Timothy, a Sailor on the USS Cole

Outstanding Volunteer Medal
National Defense Medal
Project Officer for the Inaugural Joint Chaplains Conference (Army, Air Force and Navy)
Facilitated NAVAIRES Chaplain’s Conference with the Deputy Chief of Chaplains on Critical Incident Stress Debriefing

PUBLICATIONS

Why I Am A Prison Chaplain, Official Publication of the Section of Chaplains & Related Ministries of the United Methodist Church
We Need Each Other- (Sermon) Pulpit Digest Journal
Winds and Chimes- Poetry
And What Are Dreams-Poetry
I Was In Prison-Book (November 2008)

PERSONAL

He enjoys running, kickboxing, reading, writing, public speaking and volunteering for charitable causes. Chaplain Stoglin is married to Reecia (Re’) and they have Breezy, an Italian Greyhound.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Visit us online at umcrjc.org

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Our second trip to Criminal Justice & Mercy Ministries, Oklahoma City

December 3, 2009

Again, our day started very early (6:00 am), but we had people to see and things to do.  On this trip were Rich Stoglin, Launa Virgo, Anne Crocco, Alan Bean, and Nancy Froman of St. John the Apostle United Methodist Church, and Allen Rice of Spirit Key, Inc. of Houston, TX.

We arrived at the Criminal Justice and Mercy Ministries office and met with Rev. Steve Byrd and CJAMM staff.  From there we left to visit Exodus House.  Allen was behind the camera this time.

            
We arrived at Exodus House                            Steve gives an Exodus House briefing

In April, renovations were under way to improve the apartments and building.

Then:                                                                                         and now:

Sunday school classes and church groups adopt an apartment by supplying manpower, teamwork and knowhow for the renovation and décor.  In April, we met these folks just as they were finishing an apartment.

We also visited the Community Correctional office where we were able to tour a minimum security facility.

At noon we toured St. Paul seminary where we attended a university chapel service, visited the classrooms, visited parts of the Law School, and spoke with Dr. Elaine Robinson, Academic dean of Saint Paul School of Theology at Oklahoma City University and associate Professor of United Methodist studies and Theology.

This was followed by a working lunch at the OK CJAMM office where we received a briefing followed by a question/answer session and team review.

At 5:00 we departed for Redemption church to share dinner and worship with inmates, ex-offenders, and their families.  Dinner was a delicious “spirited” chili (there was an equally delicious but less “spirited” version for those who could not take the heat).  The 6:00 service led by Rev. Dr. Stan Basler was uplifting and inspiring.  These pictures are from our April trip.

 
“Redemption Churches within the Oklahoma UMC Conference understands that once an ex-offender has  been active in a redemption Church and requests to be transferred to a mainstream UMC Church then the ex-offender will be reviewed along with the senior minister and church officers.  this, redemption churches serve as a place for offenders, ex-offenders and their families to worship together prior to  being mainstreamed into a UMC.”

 

    

We left for Arlington at 8:00 pm and made it home safe and sound at around midnight.  On the way, we discussed the problems and possibilities we would face in bringing this ministry to Arlington.  At the scheduled February meeting in Arlington we discussed the steps necessary to move forward on our goal.

Visit us online at umcrjc.org

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United Methodist Church Restorative Justice Center: Spread the word

The following is from an email sent by Ingrid McIntyre, Director of Connectional Relations:

Dear Colleagues,

Chaplain Rich Stoglin and the Rev. Dr. Stan Basler have begun a conversation and ministry which has ignited a vision for a United Methodist Restorative Justice Center.  Please read (and forward) the message and contact the Rev. Dr. Stan Basler or Chaplain Rich Stoglin to let them know your level of interest (funding, volunteering, providing expertise and staying on the grid) with them in this important ministry.  Please pass this urgent message on to any and all of your colleagues and students who have a passion for restorative justice.   Now is the time.

UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
RESTORATIVE JUSTICE CENTER

Developing Principled Christian Leaders

1. PRINCIPLE: Excerpt from Social Principles,

The Book of Discipline, 2008” page 126: “In the love of Christ, who came to save those who are lost and vulnerable, we urge the creation of a genuinely new system for the care and restoration of victims, offenders, criminal justice officials, and the community as a whole. Restorative justice grows out of biblical authority, which emphasizes a right relationship with God, self and community. When such relationships are violated or broken through crime, opportunities are created to make things right.”

2. DEVELOPING CHRISTIAN LEADERS

a. Saint Paul School of Theology has established the cornerstone by approving a specialization in the masters of divinity curriculum in Restorative Justice and Prison     Ministry.

b. The course American Criminal Law and Restorative Justice is being a course offering of both Saint Paul and Oklahoma City University Law School.

c. Through collaboration with other seminaries, universities and departments of universities restorative justice education will be made available to others students, graduate and undergraduate, to professionals in ministry and law in the form of continuing education experiences and to laity through seminars and curricula. Summit consciousness raising events will also be offered, hopefully as soon as spring of 2011.

d. The development of advocates for biblically consistent systemic change will be the goal of all educational efforts.

e. United Methodist clergy are uniquely qualified for chaplaincy in correctional settings. The Center will engage in theological education and support funding of the C.T.S. correctional chaplaincy scholarship fund to expand this area of Christian leadership.

Congregational Development

1. NEW CONGREGATIONS: The Center would train and consult with persons on a nationwide basis about development of Redemption Church congregations. Four such congregations exist in Oklahoma. They are congregations of prisoners, ex-prisoners, their families and religious volunteers. These congregations have dying host churches who have found new life by transitioning into a mission outpost to socially alienated persons.

2. TRADITIONAL CONGREGATIONS: The Center will be involved in training and consciousness raising with laity and clergy motivating and inspiring persons to places in ministry with prisoners, ex-prisoners, their families, victims of crime and correctional employees. Training will include victim-offender mediator and circle facilitator training, along with hands-on ministry training. As persons find volunteer opportunities, local churches may become more welcoming and inclusive of persons affected by the criminal justice and correctional complex.

Ministry with the Poor

1. PRISONERS, EX-PRISONERS AND THEIR FAMILIES: Most offenders, adult and juvenile and their families are economically and inter-generationally poor. African Americans and Hispanics are proportionally overrepresented in the criminal justice system. Children of parents who are incarcerated are severely impacted by parental incarceration and much more likely to go to prison as adults. Women in prison are typically even more economically disadvantaged. High rates of mental illness and addiction characterize this population.

2. PRISONER RE-ENTRY: Most prisoners re-enter society economically poor and socially alienated. The center will provide training about transitional living facilities and about the issues of re-entry. It will provide training to volunteers about ministry in this setting in terms of direct ministry. It will also train and engage in advocacy for systemic change to remove obstacles to pro-social thinking and behavior.

Improving Health Globally

Mental illness and Addiction are ills that afflict populations impacted by the criminal justice system in substantial numbers. Restorative justice embraces adequate and available treatment resources. Restorative Justice is proactive. It is grounded in the Old Testament vision of a society in which everyone’s basic life needs are met. The present retributive system is reactive, focusing on individual transgressions rather than social, distributive justice. The work of the Center will create advocates whose work by its very nature will seek to improve the health of communities, at least in this country.

Summary of the Vision

The center will be the home of restorative justice and related ministries for the United Methodist connection. It will collaborate with agencies, conferences, seminaries and local churches within the connection. Collaboration will also be on an ecumenical level and, within theological limits; the collaboration will be interfaith and secular. The litmus test, in this sense, will be on “what is good” (Micah 6:8) in terms of Christian theology. It will provide education and training to equip persons and congregations for personal holiness (hands-on ministry) and social holiness (systemic change).

 

Rev. Dr. Stan Basler
1501 N.W. 24th Street
Oklahoma City, OK 73106
email: sbasler@okumc.org
(405
) 530-2015

Chaplain Rich Stoglin
richstoglin@sbcglobal.net
(817
) 690-8571

Thank you for your connectional spirit in getting the word out!

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Our first trip to Criminal Justice & Mercy Ministries, Oklahoma city, OK

We Begin

April 3, 2009: Chaplain Rich Stoglin and members of St. John the Apostle UMC invited others to join their mission team trip to the Oklahoma Conference where they visited the Criminal Justice and Mercy Ministries office, Exodus House and Redemption Church. Exodus House is one of 4 UMC halfway house ministries for inmates making their transition to life on the outside. Redemption Church is one of the conference’s 4 places of worship for ex-offenders and their families, certain pre-screened inmates and the non-incarcerated. Stoglin, a retired UM chaplain with the Federal Justice System and the US Navy, coordinated this trip which was intended for those who are interested in discovering how the Criminal Justice & Mercy Ministries can assist the church in its efforts to establish effective opportunities to address comprehensive justice issues

At 6:00 am Oklahoma is very far away
On the trip were: St. John The Apostle UMC – Rich Stoglin, Joe Stenger, Launa Virgo, and Betsey Backman, Donna Bursey of Acton UMC was there as well.

How is this done?  15 years of unwavering support where success is the only option.

A continuity of care through:

1. Counseling, Educational Opportunities, Dependency Issues Treated, Assistance with Government Agencies and After Care
2. Provide Opportunities for Family and Personal Growth and Learning
3. Develop Job Readiness and Financial Planning Skills

Renovations are under way to improve the apartments and building.  Each Monday, the residents have a pot luck dinner. The main room is being renovated, so they have been holding the meetings in the courtyard – the weather has been great!  Ex-offenders Estelle Turbyfill and Les Lamp They now run Exodus House.  We met a local church group as they were finishing up work on their adopted apartment. Sunday School classes and church groups adopt an apartment by supplying manpower, teamwork and knowhow for the renovation and décor

Fellowship:  Inmates have the opportunity to visit with family members and even share a meal provided by churches or brought by family members. Having the opportunity to socialize in a relaxed environment is significant in allowing inmates to begin to think about transitioning back into community.

Worship:  Worship is at non-traditional times for most churches with a service on Sunday afternoon and on Thursdays evening.

Classes: (At least one day a week, classes are offered after worship) may include: Alcoholic Anonymous, Narcotics Anonymous, Thinking for a Change, Relapse Prevention, Parenting for Prevention, Disciples Bible Study, Confirmation, Computer training, Budgeting

The Redemption Church model has now produced one of the fastest growing churches in their conference. Redemption Churches within the Oklahoma UMC Conference understands that once an ex-offender has been active in a Redemption Church and requests to be transferred to a mainstream UMC Church then the offender will be reviewed along with the senior minister and church officers.  Thus, Redemption Churches serve as a place for offenders, ex-offenders and their families to worship together prior to be mainstreamed into a UMC. Rev. Dr. Stan Basler is the current Director of the Oklahoma CJAMM. Thanks to his hard work and commitment of the OK UMC Conference, they have together made this ministry the model for CJAMM of the United Methodist Church

Redemption Church, Exodus House and Criminal Justice and Mercy Ministries all grow from
our willingness to be a witness to God’s grace and a commitment to
Prison ministry – the very foundations of The Methodist Church.

We returned to St.John’s near midnight – tired but excited.
We will be back with more people to witness this miracle.

umcrjc@yahoo.com

________________________________________________________________________________________


I Was In Prison: United Methodist Perspectives on Prison Ministry

James M. Shopshire (Editor), Mark C. Hicks (Editor), Richmond Stoglin (Editor)

Available through Amazon.com and Cokesbury.com

 

 

 

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